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Full text of "Pine needles"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/pineneedles1993nort 



1993 PINE NEEDLES 



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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



AT GREENSBORO 



VOLUME 81 



TITLE 1 



UNCc * 




2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 




19 9 3 

PINE NEEDLES 



VOLUME 81 



Table of Contents 



Opening 4 

People 36 

Academics 140 

Organizations 172 

Athletics 200 

Closing 220 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 



TRADITION 



Tradition — a strong element 
at The University of North 
CaroHna at Greensboro. Since 
the University's founding in 
1891, students, faculty, and 
administrators have proudly 
continued in the path begun by 
Charles Duncan Mclver. The 
people who are The University 
of North Carolina at 
Greensboro of today cherish 
the school's rich history. The 
chance to become a part of this 
tradition draws a new group of 
students each year. 






LIFESTYLES 



Lifestyles — a synthesis of 
new ideas springing from the 
interactions with new friends, 
with nature, and with the 
University's environment. As 
the campus fills up with life in 
mid- August, UNCG becomes 
the home of many unique 
temperaments, philosophies, 
and credos that mesh with the 
architectural surroundings to 
form a collage of personality 
that is the spirit of the 
University . . . both good and 



bad. 






CHALLENGE 



Challenge — coming in, no 
student knows exactly what to 
expect of the next four years. 
How different the classes, 
workload, professors, campus 
life, the new taste of freedom 
will be compared to the recent 
high school experience. Some 
will find it not so bad, others 
will consider their programs 
tougher than they could have 
ever imagined, but everyone can 
count on one sure thing: A 
life-altering chance at challenge 
c\\ IJNC Greensboro. 






CLLTiLzIi?^ 



CHANGE 




healthy existence. A certain 
amount of continuous 
development is required to keep 
UNCG productively growing. 
But at a university so tradition- 
rich as this one, any change must 
be carefully undertaken so that it 
might blend into the beautifully 
sculptured pattern that the 
school has already designed. 



DIVERSIONS 



Diversions — the growth of 
the intellect and the soul cannot 
be measured by the mere 
amassing of cerebral volumes. 
The UNCG community provides 
not only for the mental growth 
of students, but also for the quiet 
relaxation (or re-creation) of the 
after-hours student who finds his 
own ways of unwinding after a 
long day of grueling classes. 





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CLASSES 



Classes — an institution of 
higher learning with a long- 
standing commitment to 
excellence always includes a 
gamut of faces and a multitude 
of academic exercises in tests 
and research papers that make 
life at the University both 
exciting and challenging. 



faculty of nationally known 
scholars, continues to be a 
creative center. 



SPORTS 



years, the UNCG Spartan 
athletic program, featuring ten 
teams and a dedicated co-ed 
cheerleading squad, rose from 
NCAA Division III to NCAA 
Division!. On July 1, 1992, 
UNCG reach another milestone 
when it united with nine other 
schools to form the revamped 
Big South Conference, thus 
providing the program with 
more identity. 




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OPENING 17 



WHAT IS A WOMAN? 



This morning, I 
woke up and got ready 
for my day: picked out 
what I wanted to wear, 
dried my hair and ate. 
As I prepared to leave 
my room, I took one 
last look at the mirror 
to make sure I looked 
okay. Something hap- 
pened when I looked at 
my reflection. I 
didn't see me. I saw a 
mature, independent 
woman. I felt like I 
was looking at someone 
else. That woman in 
the mirror couldn't be 
me- I didn't want it 
to be. I wanted to run 
to the comfort of my 
Daddy's strong arms. I 
wanted my mom to hold 
me and stroke my hair 
as she rocked slowly 
back and forth. For a 
fleeting moment , those 
thoughts coursed 
through my brain. But 
they were gone as 
quickly as they came. 
I was again in the re- 
flection. I shook my 
head, as if to clear 
the memory. I walked 
out of the room leaving 
the scared child be. 
Now, as I have time to 



sit and reflect on that 
scene, many thoughts 
flow through my brain. 
Am I really as mature 
as I think I am? As 
strong? As indepen- 
dent? I don't know. 
Just yesterday things 
seemed so clear to me. 
I do know that some- 
times I feel lost, 
sometimes I feel like I 
can do anything and 
others I feel like a 
helpless child. As a 
woman, I want respect, 
I want people to know I 
am capable of doing 
anything. But I also 
want a man to open 
doors for me, to pick 
me daisies, to stand 
outside my window and 
serenade me, to protect 
me and to love me. 

I guess there ore 
two "me's". One who is 
that mature, indepen- 
dent woman, and the 
other who is scared, 
helpless and very emo- 
tional. So what does 
that mean? I don't 
know. I can't help but 
think there ore other 
women out there who 
feel as I do. Maybe 
this is what being a 



woman is all about. I 
think maybe I need 
those two "me's". You 
know, it's not so bad. 
Actually, it's pretty 
cool. If I didn't have 
those two sides to my 
personality, I wouldn't 
be me at all, now would 
I? Yes, this is what 
being a woman means for 
me: a melting together 
of very emotional char- 
acteristics and very 
logical ones. 




ARCHITECTURE 



Architecture — if UNCG's 
collective buildings were a piece 
of music, they would sound like 
Bartok's Die 6 Streichquartette. 
Just as Bartok's works trace a 
historic time reflected in his 
complex network of textures, 
colors, harmonies, and 
techniques, so do the 
seventy-some structures of 
UNCG's nearly 200 acres plot a 
time-line rich in variation. From 
the centenarian Foust Building 
to its infant sibling Student 
Recreation Center, each building 
mirrors the era of its erection. 





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OPENING 21 




24 OPENING 





ALUIMNI 



Established in 1893 by ten 

graduates of the State Normal 

and Industrial College for 

mmBam 
Women "to further the 



graduates by increasing the 
interest of its members in the 
School and in each other." 
Independent from the University 
in 1994, the Association propels 
common aims by offering i 
opportunities for each 
organization to lend strength to 
the other's programs and 
activities. 



COIVIIVIENCEIVIENT 



The fixed-by-custom order of 
the procession, the Mace borne 
by the faculty marshal, the 



Chain-of-Office worn by the 
Chancellor, the Academic 
Banners displaying designs ^^ 
unique to UNCG, the Academic 
Regalia comprised of three types 
of gowns and hoods and thirty 
colors of hood linings and cap 
tassels, the University Bell, the 
University Commencement 
Band and Chorus, the University 
Marshals, guest speaker, family, 
friends, frolic — all combine to 
celebrate this point of beginning. 





OPENING 27 




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28 OPENING 



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COIMIVIUNITY 



With well over 10,000 UNCG 
graduates living in Guilford 
County, a faculty of over 600, ^ 
and enrollment of approximately 
12,000, it is nearly impossible to 
escape the impact of the 
University on the Triad 
community. The banks, the 
symphony orchestra, hospitals, 



community choruses, service 
industry, churches, insurance 
companies, and school system 
all boast the influence of UNCG 
and its graduates. 



^._^ 




30 OPENING 




OPENING .31 



BASICS 



Hold on! Let's get back to 
basics. Coming off of the 
expansive Greedy Eighties, 
there's a fresh sense of 
discovering what is really 
worthwhile — for our global 
environment, for our physical 
health, for the well-being of all 
people, for our mental and 
emotional selves, and for 
ourselves in our relationships. 
We are expanding internally, 
questing for inward fullness. We 
are marking today's era with 
conscious and thoughtful m 
decision-making. 




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OPENING 33 




34 OPENING 




OPENING 35 




p 

E 

O 
P 
L 
E 



Erin Acht'son 



Lori Albertv 



Samir Aleni 



Marsha Allen 



Michelle Allen 



Michelle Allen 



Jacqueline 
Alphonso 



Michele Alston 



0. 0% 



f/ji 



Elizabeth Amburn 
Wendy Andrews 
Donna Ange 
Leonard Antonelli 

Lisa Apple 

Thomas Ashcraf't 

Dana Ashvvoith 

Perry Auton 

3X Sl.NlOHS 





Elizabeth 
Auwarter 



Meredith Bandt 



Catherine Bandy 



Tracv Bankett 



Lorie Barbour 



Schvuler Barbour 



Stephanie Barford 



Denise Barth 






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■/■■/ 




Jake Beil 
Anissa Bentle 
Helen Berg 
Douglas Bernstein 

Theresa Berrier 
Lori Bescher 
Camille Billops 
Daniel Black 



Angela Blair 




Tova Bradshaw 



Adrienne BransoTi 



Gwendolyn 
Braswell 



Melissa Briscoe 

40 SINIORS 



Lativia Brooks 



Monique Brooks 



Zackarv Brooks 



A« 'vV\*» Andrea Brown 




Allyson Camp 

Laura Cannoy 

Melissa Capps 

SENI<>/<S 41 



Dawn Carter 



Danetta Casev 



Sharon 
Castleberrv 



Jennifer Cavalero 




Wendv Coble 



Corinne Coffe 



Clezeal Collains 



Amy Collins 
42 SEMOKS 




Julie Collins 



Rushena (Collins 



Halev CoLson 



James Conder 



Laura Confer 



Kathleen Conkey 



Antihoula 
Contogiannis 



Carlton Cook 






Winona 
Corpening 

Sharon Corry 

Melissa Costa 

Shauna Crawfoixl 

Laura Creasy 

Melanie Crissman 

Diane Cron 

Ernest Cudjoe 

SENIORS 43 



Deonn 
Cunningham 



Sean Curley 



Sheila Currie 



Percina Curtis 



Rebecca Curtis 



Lori D'Ambrosio 



Sue Dale 



Karen Da\ 



Katherine Davis 



Zolee Da\ 



Bonnie Decoste 



John Deighan 



Andrea 
Diffenderfer 



Jennifer 
Digregorio 



Stephanie Dillard 

Keri'v Dockery 

44 SENIORS 





Ernest Dollai-, .Ji 



Marisin 
Dominguez 



Deborah 
Donnalley 



Pamela Duecker 



Aaron Duhaime 



Robvn Durham 



Stephanie Eason 



Opherral Eaton 



/ 



Rhonda Edenfield 



Mary Edge 



Scott Elder 



Elizabeth Elias 



Kimberlv Elliott 



Kellv Embler 



Erik Enberg 



^'•y ^ Staci Ervin 



SENIORS 45 



Meredith Eskridge 

Andrew Esposito 

Yvette Everette 

Jill Fagaley 

Deangela Farrar 

Leslie Fensin 

Cameron Ferguson 

Gregory Ferguson 




77 



Cvnthia Fields 



Sheila Finan 



La'trice Firms 



Avres Fitzgerald 



Cui-tis Fitzgerald 



Tracie Foels 



Lanesia Fonville 



Elizabeth F"(i\vler 
4(1 Sli.MORS 



AMki 




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Lenore Franzese 



Gina Freeman 



Mary Freeman 



Noelle Frenzel 



Lvnn Fullerton 



Miho Furuko 



Aimee Garner 



Dana Gaspar 



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Kenvon Gatlin 



Brenda Gerringer 



Gina Giarracco 



Angela Gibson 



Richard Gibson 



Aresa Gilbert 



John Gillikin 



Jessica Gorvcki 

SENIORS 47 



Melanie Gosinski- 
Rov 



Deidra Graham 



Andrea Graves 



Lanette Green 



Sherrv Greenwood 



Melonie Grier 



Kevin Griffin 



Laura Gurlev 



7 • / 




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Y V "* 



Julie 
Gutschenritter 



Tracev Haigler 



Jason Hall 



Hayli Hanna 



Jennv Harrel 



Anthony Harris 



Cynthia Harris 



Michael Harris 



./ 



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UN 




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Monique Heath 
Tempest Hemby 
Debra Hemphill 
Debra Hemric 



Geneva 
Henderson 



Margot Henson 



Melodie Henson 



Gina Hepler 



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Dianne Hill 



Regina Hill 



Cinamon 
Hinshaw 



Shelby Hite 

Kelly Hobbs 

Susan Hockaday 

Michele Hodges 

Andrew Hoi brook 
SENIORS 44 



Helena Holder 

Hayley Hollar 

Rebecca HoUoway 

Jocelyn Hollowell 

Melanie Hoover 




Rhonda Howard 



David Howe 



Daniel Huff 



Jackie Hunt 



Patrick Ide 



Dawn Idol 



Tracey Ingram 
50 SENIORS 




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Faith Inman 



John Irvin 



Zhoowan Jackson 



Alexandra Jaeger 



Nahne Jagdeo 



Barbara Janke 



Tarra Jenkins 



Tonva Jenkins 



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Timothy Jewell 
Amy Johnson 
Candace Johnson 
Edward Johnson 

Patricia Johnson 

Susan Johnson 

Tracy Johnson 

Amy Johnston 

SENIORS 51 



Sara Johnston 



Angela Jone 



Brandon Jone 



Charmon Jones 




Nadine Kernodle 

Einian Ivlialil 

Shaye Kidd 

Douglas Kilgore 
s: si: MORS 



Laura Kirkinan 



Amie Kistler 



P^j'istie Kizziah 




Beth Levine 

Tracy Lewis 

Nyleve Lillard 

SENIORS 5? 



Matthew Lloyd 

Gevon Lockhart 

Caroline Long 

Sabrina Long 




Robert Martin 



Judith Martineau 



Lori Massingi 
?4 si:ni< >rs 



Marielena Mata 
Bettie Mauney 
Deborah Mayes 



Cheryl McCoUum 




Matthew McGraw 



Kathleen McHale 



Carla McNeil 



Stephen 
McPherson 



Eileen McPhillips 

SENIORS 55 



Mark McRorie 



Mark Merner 



Maria Michael 



Lois Miles 



Teresa Minshew 



Maritza Molina 




Kevin Moser 



Melissa Moss (I 
56 SI-:mc)KS 




Randy Mueller 
Yolinda Murphy 
Melissa Murray 
Michael Nance 

Dana Neal 
Teresa Neese 
Joy Nelson 
Erica Newkirk 



• 7 , T' IT. 



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Cecelia Newman 
George Newman 
Virginia Newman 
Wendy Newton 

Catherine Nieken 

Mary Nifong 

Bill Nolen 

Ekong Ntuen 

SENIORS ?7 



Sara Jane Nuesa 



Tina Oliver 



Mona Olson 



Susan Ornt 



Mitzi Owens 



Wendi Owens 



Khristina Parcel 



Amv Pardue 



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Melissa Parker 






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Bonnie Parsons 


K * '- 2 


Decelinna Partono 


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Sandra Paulikas 




Robin Peiffer 






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Angelina Perez 






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Lynn Perryman 




Rachelle Peterson 




5s st:.\toRS 






Cynthia Pfaff 



Lynelle Pinnix 



Sina Pipkin 



Monica Pollard 



Jon Porter 



Tracv Porter 



Heather Posey 



Letitia Powell 



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!-tR ' 



Michelle Powell 
Crystal Pratt 
Todd Preuninger 
Jimmie Priddy 

Tracy Pryor 

Roya Quails 

John Quesenbury 

Sherri Quinn 

SENIORS 5M 



Jennifer Rackley 

Thomas Ratledge 

Roxanna Ray 

Lisa Raymer 

Jody Reavis 

Rebecca Reich 

Donna Reid 

Eric Reid 

1 ^W T. 



Robbie Rhodes 



Shannon Riggsbee 



Simone Roberts 



Andrew Rogers 



Consuela Rogers 



Leslie Rogers 



Heather Romaine 



Michael Rose 

W) SLMDRS 





Jennifer 
Rosenbaum 



Heidi Rudl 



Tina Rudl 



Paul Russ 



Rebecca Russell 



Garrett Sauve 



Lee 
Schneiderman 



Barrv Schrum 






I ■\ 



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Margaret Scott 



Michael Seamans 



Janice Sebastian 



Eric Self 



Melissa Sellers 



Sharen 
Shackelford 



Jennifer Shannon 



Julie Shatterly 

SENIORS 61 







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Christina Shaver 


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Alesa Shehon 
Pamela Shepherd 


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Kimberly Shifflett 


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Megumi Shirai 


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Kim Shropshire 


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Maryanna 


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Shuping 


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Tamra Simmons 


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nr- 



Jennifer Simpson 



Roslyn Simpson 



Clarence 

Slaughter 



Shannon 
Slaughter 



Tomika Small 



Brietta Smith 



Charlos Smith 



Marcia Smith 

(i2 si:ni()Rs 









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Todd Smith 



Virginia Smith 



Zandra Smith 



Ami Smith- 
Palenchai" 



Lars Snadvik 



Deborah Spillman 



Marv Stabler 



Sean Stalls 



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Sandra Stanesco 


i^B^*"^ vv Hi 




W "' '' MM 


Tonya Stanley 




Susan Stansbury 




Teresa Steele 


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Elizabeth Stewart 


jg *^ wi 


Elizabeth Stewart 


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Christa Stilley 


IMNp 


Melissa Stone 


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SENIORS 63 



Jeffrey Stuckey 

Tracy Suggs 

Susan Surratt 

Tiffany Swann 




Carolvn Thoma 



M Sf^NIORS 






Gcrri Thomas 



Teresa Thomas 



Ivimberly 
Thrasher 




4^ 'J'/:. 



Millard Upchurch 
Mary Uzochukwu 
Suzanne Villani 

Richard Vestal 
Deborah Walker 
Andrea Wallace 

Melanie Wallen 

1 SENIORS fiS 



Andrea Walser 



Milton Ward III 



Melissa Watkins 



Anne Watterson 




Terence Westrv 



Angela Whatlev 



Karen Whetston 



Carlene Whidden 

fifi Sf-:M()RS 




Beth White 



Devona Whitsett 



Chervl Wilhams 



Gazelle Williams 



Juliana Williams 



Shelly Williams 



Brian Williamson 



Melissa Wolfe 






Janey Wood 
Latonya Woods 
Maureen Worden 
Selina Woung 

Tina Yarborough 

Lorri Yaskiewicz 

Carla Young 

Christine Young 
SENIORS 67 



Deborah Zeringue 



George Zuniga 





The Chancellor's Convocation on 
Thnrsday. August 20. 1992 was 
the official welcome given to all 
new students at UNCG after a week 
of orientation programs aimed at 
makini: them feel at home. 



When students signed up for Rac- 
quetball 273. no longer did they 
ha\e to be bused to the nearest 
YMCA. They needed only to 
walk to the multi-million dollar 
Student Recreation Center. 



Total award dollars from reseaich 
and training grants rose to $12.4 
nidlion during the 1991-92 fiscal 
year — marking a 44.3 percent 
mcrease over the previous twelve 
months. 



70 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEXR i.\ Ri:vii:n i\ 



AUGUST 
1992 



Dr. Alice C. Patterson, former di- 
rector of the Lifelong Learning 
Program at Furman University. 
was appointed acting director of 
the Career Services Center at 
UNCG. 



UNCG received a $3().()()() giant 
from the N.C. Science and Math- 
ematics Alliance (NCSMA) to 
support teacher education pro- 
sirams. 



Dr. Robert Christina was named 
the new dean of the School of 
Health and Human Performance. 



The LINC Board of Gosernors 
earmarked SIO million for reno- 
\ ations to dormitories on camptis. 



72 iT:AR m REVIEW 





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YEAR IN RhVlEWl} 



Candice Adam 



June Albriiihi 



Kulherine Allen 



Diana Alston 




Ivv Anderson 



Jennifer Baujan 

Angela Bell 

Thomas Bello 

Clinstopher Bennington 

Atiha Bethea 

Heather Bmgham 

Marianne Boghn its 

Terrance Bogues 
74 .11 'MORS 





Natalie Bradv 



Wendv Bradv 



Taininv Brodks 



Wendv Brown 



Charles Briilon 



Molly Buekley 



Catherine Burress 



Paul Bvron 




Sharolyn Carpenter 
Karen Caveness 
Tina Christopher 
Tiffany Clagett 

Judy Clark 

Susan Clark 

Monica Cline 

James Coale 

JUNIORS 75 



Julia Comfort 



Dana Copeland 



Jenniter Costner 



Sharmin Cox 



Maiv Jane Cruz 



Steven Curric 



Geoffrey Curtis 



Danielle D'Arco 




Aslilev Daniel 



EmiK Dauizhtridtie 



Corbm Dnks 



Chnstc ipher I> maldv m 



Miuiiiel Diidle\ 



Esther Ebhojavt 



Nalalie Exiuis 
?(-. .11 'MORS 





Hliss;! 1-wall 



Hollie Fill 



Michael Fasani) 



Jennifer Ferrel 



Stephanie Fisher 



Monica Ford 



Cynthia Foushee 



Michelle Fox 




Timothia Freeman 



Marion Garner 



Heather Ganison 



Kristin Gasparik 



Laura Generous 



Andrea Girolami 



Chris Goklston 



Leslie Goodman 

JUNIORS 11 



Amy Goodu ill 



Chemali Goonetilckc 



Maria Greene 



Sandra Grunkc 



Deonna Giiz/etti 



Donald Haase 



Georce Hairc 



Nichole Hall 




Ericka Hampton 



KimbcrK Have 



Joshua Hinson. 



Elmia Hod'jc 



Kaila Horton 



Jamie Hiimplirev 



Charles Ireson 



Heidi Janke 
7,S JUNIORS 








Brvan Jenkins 



Derrick Jdlinsciii 



Marshall Joliiison 



Kishaan Kariaj; 
Is varan 



Kim Kazmierc/ak 



Marivcc Kcarns 



Nichole Kennedy 



Renae Kennedy 




Mitzi Kina 



Clianiia 
KiinikLilasuriva 



Insrid Lassiter 



Joanna Leake 



Wanda Le\ inson 



Brian Lewis 



Laura Linton 



Mandy Little 

JUNIORS 74 



Marsha Mahonov 



April Martiiidak- 



Kimberly Musters 



Jennifer Metcalf 



Nikki Middletun 



Leslie Miller 



Jonetta Mil 



Miehele Mil 




Christina Milchell 



Sheila Mitchel 



Lavera Monroe 



Eric Montaonierv 



Marlene Moon 



Kaniara Moore 



Trud_\ Morrison 
SO J ['MORS 




mniTMAL 




Tammy Mosley 



Mattie IV1( 



Jcnmter Multciid 



Lauren Miiqihy 



Eldridgc Narley 



Shannon Ncelv 



Marearet Newton 



Holly Nielsen 




David Noviek 



Cindy Owen 



Teena Patterson 



Krista Pawloski 



Joanna Pavne 



Melinda Pearce 



Juan Pena 



Kaihy Phillips 

JUNIORS Kl 



Walter Pickard 



Carmelita Pickcti 



Steven Pierce 



Katrina Poteat 



Lamont Prysock 



Erica Revnolds 



Jennifer Robbins 



Randv Roeer^ 



Marv Ri 



Heather Runilev 



KimbcrK Rlismi 

Michael Ruttlc 

Brian Schruni 

Susan Seaver 
S2 .niNIORS '\ 





Hollv SIhiIlm- 



RoniiaKn SiiniiioiuK 



Sandra Snipes 



Stephanie SprLiill 



Valeric Slanclland 



Robert Stanley 



Kelli Stone 



Allison Stonesit'er 




Donna Stvers 



Caroline Tanner 



D\\ ight Thompson 
iiV^^^^^I Janies Tinuen 



Jennifer Tinker 



Vincent Trotta 



Christina Uloscvich 



David Vestal 



JUNIORS S3 



Michelle Virtue 



Alice Visconli 



Jaiina Walker 



Latcinja Watford 



William Weatherlv 



Saniiiiv Webb 



Anne Weisner 



Derek Welvan" 




CliarUnte White 
Latasha Wilson 

Scott Wilson 

Tonya Wilson 

Jelt Winstead 

Matthew Wood 

Traci Wood 

Taniica Yount; 



S4 JUNIORS 











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SSSSim 





Presidential candidate Bill Clinton 
came to Greensboro on September 
1st to discuss his campaign plat- 
t'orni to two ditYerent groups ol 
people. 



Freshmen and students returning 
to the residence halls this semester 
found a new telephone system had 
been installed within the dorms 
( 1S50 new lines to be exact). 



On September 24. the city of 
Greensboro was no longer the same. 
War Memorial Auditorium, part of 
the Greensboro Coliseum complex, 
officially re-opened its doors alter 
four months of renovations for a 
concert from The Black Crow es. 



Dr. Mark L. Failla. a professoi- of 
food, nutrition and food ser\ice 
management at UNCG received a 
three year grant of $23 1 .703 from 
the U.S. Department of Agricid- 
ture. 



86 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR /;V REVIEW 87 




Greensboro Mayor Victor M. 
Nussbaum Jr.. in recognition of 
the Centennial Year of UNCG. 
proclaimed Sunday, September 20. 
to be UNCG Day in Greensboro. 



Dr. Eileen Kohlenberg and Dr. 
Rebecca Parrish. assistant profes- 
sors in the school of nursing, were 
selected as two of the Great 100 
Registered Nurses in North Caro- 
lina for 1*^92. 



Dr. Katherine Mille of the Uni- 
\ersity of South Carolina (USC) 
assumed her duties as director ol' 
the women's .studies program at 
the University. 



The Men's soccer team went 3-1 
with victories over Virginia Tech 
and a 2-0 shutout of St. Mary's 
duiing the MetLife Classic played 
in San Francisco. California. 




88 YEAR IN REVIEW 




f -^ -► > 



YHAR IN REVIEW ^^) 



John Alpeiti 



Valerie Arnistroii 



Dana Barksdale 




Sascha Dallas 



Karen Dean 
90 SOPHOMORES 




f^v 



Kcgaii Dcliiiicy 
Xrulrcw Downs 
JacqiicliiK" Diida 
Michael l5urLiji 

^'L■lICla Evans 
Kellic Faninylon 
Sii/anne Ferguson 
Fredrick Files 



'M^4 C - " 


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i^ruh-y^. 


Vv 






Jessica Finch 



Antonia Fishel 



Karl\n Fisher 



LoLiise Fit/.sinions 



Aiiizela Freeman 



Kaori Fuse 



Travis Getz 



Ashley Glenn 
SOPHOMORES 91 



Stephanie Gra\el\ 



Anita GrecoiA 



Anita Hai\cll 



Kiniberly Houston 



Ht)llv HuhlxiR 



Lizabeth Hmiter 



Jenin .lame 



Kristi Johnson 



Stephanie Jojokiaii 



Virsiinia Jordan 



Susette Kellev 



Jeffrey Key 



Carol Lan>;sion 



Amber Larson 



Dorothv Lewis 



Andrea Losian 



92 SOPHOMORES 





RdIuUi Marshal 



Kellv Marliii 



Aiiijcla Matthews 



Michael Messier 



Naiicv Missroon 



Melissa Newton 



■ Cindy Pieper 



Rachael Potts 



. »'/ 



/ 



Milaeros Rivera 



Amancia Robinson 



Rachel Rust 



Gray Sappentield 



Meredith Schiiltz 



Brian Seaver 



Gretchen Shelton 



Gabriel Shingu 
SOPHOMORES 93 



Dewayne 

Southern 



Paul StarkcN 



Karen Stephen 



^l II 





The UNCG Volleyball team re- 
turned to Greensboro on Tluirs- 
day. September 10 with a 3-1 vie- 
tory over Appalachian State Uni- 
versity and their first road win of 
the season. 



President Bush came to the Koury 
Convention Center in Greensboro 
on Wednesday, September 23. 
outlining his plan to help small 
birsinesses "compete and win" in 
the economy. 



The UNCG Police Department 
raised a grand sum of $4.5 10 lor 
the Special Olympics during the 
I '-)y2 Law Entorcemeni Torch Run. 



At least six Sigma Phi Epsilon 
pledge members and one t'ratci- 
nily brother beat and ncaiiy 
strangled an empktycc at the 
Greensboro Ramanda Hotel. 



96 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW ^7 



Swi'ci Charity came to UNCCi lo 
open the UNCG Theater's 7()lh 
season. The play ran tVoiii 
Wednesday. September 30 through 
Sunday. October 4 in Taylor The- 
ater. 



The IQ92 Reggae Sunsplash 
rocked the triad on September 26 
at the Jaycee Fairuroiind. 



The Greensboro Historical Mu- 
seum hosted a Centennial exhibit 
at UNCG that opened on Septem- 
ber 18 and ran Lintil October .i I . 



Pi Sigma Epsilon sponsored a 
canned food drive to benefit \ ic- 
tims of the Hurricane Andrew di- 
saster, beginning September28 and 
endint; on October 3. 



98 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW 44 




Ms. Ann Gaither. chair-person and 
chief executive officer of J.H. 
Heafner Company Inc. of 
Lincohiton. was re-elected as chair 
of the Board of Trustees at UNCG. 



Six students from UNCG partici- 
pated in a social work internship in 
Glasgow. Scotland. Dr. Thomas 
Scullion, a professor in the de- 
partment of social work, accom- 
panied the students on the trip. 



The volleyball team miprosed its 
record to 8-3 thanks to a strong 
performance m the UNCG In\ ita- 
iional Tournament held Septem- 
ber 18 and 19 in the Spectatoi- 
Gym. The Spartans won thiee of 
ihc lour matches m the event and 
accomplished a three-wa\ tic for 
the tournament ciowii. 



100 YEAR IN REVIEW 




S C I 





m « 










YEAR IN REVIEW 1(11 




UNCG concluded :ls \cai--l(Miy 
Centennial Celebration with a 
special Founders Day Coinoca- 
tion on Monday. October 5. at I 1 
a.m. in Aycock Auditorium. Oc- 
tober 5 holds special significance 
for the institution because it w as 
exactly 100 years ago (1892) that 
the State Normal and Industrial 
School ( later Woman" s College ami 
now UNCG ) first opened its doors 
to classes. 



Recreational activities, soccer 
games, a comedy show leaturing 
professional comedians, a paiade 
and fireworks were Just some ot 
the activities for Homecoming 
Week '92 at UNCG. 



Members of the Ein ironmenlal 
Awareness FoLindation (E.AF) and 
concerned students marched in a 
circle outside of Aycock Atidilo- 
iium on Monday. October ,S. in 
protest of UNCG's failure to com- 
pl\ with N.C. Senate Bill 1 11. 







102 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR I\ Ri:\ lEW 



OCTOBER 
1992 



Chcncutta Thurman was crowned 
Homecoming Queen and Patrick 
Scales was named Homecoming 
King during halftime of the soccer 
game against Georgia State. Tlic 
Spartans won 3-2. 



In light of the recent occurrences 
involving UNCG fraternities, tiic 
InterFraternity Council (IFC) held 
a meeting on Monday. October I 2 
in which a "code of conduct" v\as 
ordered of all fraternities. The IPC 
decided that each fraternity \\ as to 
turn in a w ritten "code of conduct" 
within two weeks. 



UNCG was elected to full mem- 
bership in the National Associa- 
tion of State Uni\ ersities and Land- 
Grant Colleges (NASULGC). the 
iiatii)n's oldest higher education 
association. 



104 YEAR IN REVIEW 








YEAR L\ REM i:\\ 105 




Dr. Keith Howell, u public health 
education professor at UNCG re- 
ceived an $84,000 grant to help in 
the war on drugs among people in 
Saudi Arabia. Egypt. Nepal and 
Bangladesh. 



Monday . Oct. 1 2 marked the 500th 
anniversary of Columbus" ""dis- 
covery" of the Americas, and w ith 
the celebration came much pro- 
test. Jan Elliott, a Cherokee Indian 
from N.C. who is currently Direc- 
tor of the Committee for American 
Indian History, and Dr. Sam Wy nn. 
a Lumbee Indian who is a Meth- 
odist minister, spoke to a group of 
people at the Elliott Uni\ersity 
Center. 



Malcolm X came to Greensboro's 
Carolma Theater October 15 and 
16 b_\ way of Michael Lange's 
stiuming performance of A/c.v.vf/x'c 
tn The Gmss Roots and Ballot of 
the Bullet. 



- i 



106 YEAR IN REVIEW 






YEAR IN REVIEW 107 



The Norlh Camlina State Fair 
opened Friday Oct. 16 and lan 
through Sunday, Oct. 23. Taizged 
with the (heme. '"Discover Agn- 
cullure." the lO-day event's main 
draw IS laniiini; exhibits. 



Greg Easleibrook. a graduate stu- 
dent of UNCG. was selected as 
one of foiu' national winners v\ho 
recci\ed a $5, 000 award in the 
iy'-)3 Eastman Scholarship Pro- 
iiram. 



r3i-. .lohn je/orek. a professor of 
chemistry, reeei\cd a federal grant 
of $56,176 from the U.S. En\i- 
lonmental Protection Agency to 
dexelop a new application of liq- 
uid chromatouraphv. 



The Kappa Delta Rho (KDR) fra- 
ternity received their national 
charier on October 23rd by KDR 
Executive Director Donald Stohl. 



108 YFAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW l(W 




In a suggestion to further organi/e 
black students on campus and gi\ e 
them increased representation. 
Junior Delegate Scotty Brooi^s 
requested the Student Legislati\e 
Assembly's support for creating a 
new campus organization for Afri- 
can-American students. 



When the UNCG volleyball team 
defeated Georgia State, Head 
Coach Tere Dail earned her 35()lh 
career win. 



During Tuesday night's No\ . II) 
Student Legislative AssemhU 
meeting. Vice President Michael 
Pearson expressed his approval of 
the way most SLA committees 
were functioning but he criticized 
the Judiciary Committee for its 
failure to function effectivelv. 



110 YEAR l!V REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW 1 1 1 




Fi\c works of modern dance were 
t'eatuied in ihe UNCG dance t'ac- 
ully concerts, beginnint: on 
Wednesday. Nov. IS and running 
through Saturday. Nov. 21. 



Tiie Reggae band Iniani was tea- 
tured on Saturday, Nov. 7 at the 
Reggae Jam in Cone Balhoom. 
ISA hosted the concert, along with 
Campus Activities Board and the 
MulticuitLiral Exents Fund. 
Jahstice and Tuth and Rights also 
peilormed. 



The Lady Spartans lost to UNC 
Asheville in the semifinal roLuid of 
the Big South Tournament. UNCG 
completed its first volleyball sea- 
son as a member of the Big South 
Conference w ith an overall reciird 
of 22-16. 




112 YEAR IN REVIEW 




YEAR IN REVIEW 113 




The intramural table tennis season 
came to a close in mid-November 
as Joey Juin-Yuan Hu and Brian 
Oringdorff claimed the singles 
brackets. 



In light ot'thc attack onaRamanda 
hotel manager by pledges ol' 
UNCG's Sigma Phi Epsilon. the 
InterFraternity Council, along uilh 
the Sigma Phi Epsilon Alumni 
Board, sponsored a seminar on li- 
ability, risk management, and rc- 
sponsibilit_\ on No\ ember IM. 



The controversy cner the high meal 
plan costs lor students opting to 
li\e in the new student housing 
was brought to the Student Legis- 
latne Assembly's (SLA) attention. 
Residents in the new hotising 
complex would be required to pay 
about $8 a meal while students 
In ing in dorms are required to pay 
approximately $5 a meal. 






111 I III 

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114 YEAR IN REVIEW 





yi:.\H IS m:\ ii:\y ii 



Tinica Adams 



Melanie Alston 



Charles Apple 



J. Attarian 



Kara Baldwin 



Kelli Barth 



Jennifer Basie 



Adrienne Beaver 



^S 1^ 




Pamela Beet'ernian 

David Bissetle 

Chrisana Blanei> 

I\y Bodenheimer 

Kelley Bnwen 

Rebeeea Brookshire 

Teresa Bnnvn 

Brian Branson 
116 FRESHMEN 





S.irah Buck 



Alison Bums 



John Cash 



Eddie Cecil 



Heather Clayton 



Kinibcrlv Collins 



Tamela Colson 



Andv Coon 




Sarah Creech 
Christine Cullum 
Lakeitha Davis 
Leslie Davis 

Tony Davis 

Mira De Roo 

Jennifer Deal 

Patricia Dew 
FRESHMEN 117 



Lisa Dickson 



Jeuno Eden 




Kelly Freeman 



MolK Goodc 



Ashley Graham 



Da\ id Greer 



Rachel Gre-ji: 



Knsti Hales 



Tit tan V Harris 



Susan Han'ison 
118 FRESHMEN 





jniiilLM Hiitlcy 



,SIkmt\ Hcalh 



Tiffany Hedrick 



Marsha Hege 



ShciTv Hill 



Stephanie Hill 



David Hod^e 



Sherrv hiiiram 




Remona Jenkins 



Jenell Jobe 



Miehele Jodon 



Carol Johnson 



Timothy Jones 



Jo Joyce 



-ara Keith 



Heather Kerans 
FRESHMEN 119 



Emily Kis 



Kristal Kiiiiiht 



Marv Kniijht 



Esther Landis 



Crystal Laney 



Deborah Latham 



Jennifer Lavvson 



Teresa Ledtord 




Janae Lehto 



Melissa Lewter 



Knsiin Lidhoni 



Wendy Love 



Dana Liitterloh 



Austin L\ nch 



Cah ni LmkIi 



Hannah Martin 
120 FRESHMt:N 





.IciinilLT McC'Iliic 



l.is;i McDonald 



CallK'iina MiiiLicI 



("artina Mili 



Michelle Miller 



Painala Miteliell 



Tanya Morizan 



Jason Morton 




Nancy Nifong 
Michael Niirris 
Jason O'Qiimn 
Angela Pendry 

Paige Petty 

Gerald Phillips 

Pattamaporn 
Pingkarav\at 

Melanie Piltdlo 
FRESHMEN 121 



SheiTi Preslur 



Brian Ramev 



Doniia Rcid 



William Reynolds 



Miilicent Robertson 



Jeremy Sarine 



Eritv Schneider 



Heather Schneider 





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Spencer Schneider 



Summer Scott 



\Vend\ Shatter 



Monica 
Sliamsid-Deen 



Amy Sharon 

JereniN Shrew shury 

Stephen Shrewsbury 

Timothy Siher 
122 FRESHMEN 





Kaivii Simon 



("linslv SiiK-l;iir 



RebccLa Sinclair 



Roslyn Slal 



.lana StCL'd 



.laciua\ Slitl 



Shannon Stover 



Diane Styers 




;1^ 



bJiii 



Aiisjel Swinde 



Connie Turner 



Karen Tinner 



Amv Viineannon 



Salome Waiiner 



Jennifer Walker 



Tamara Watts 



Brian Wauiih 



FRESHMEN 12.3 



Holly Whitten 



Michelle Wilfoni: 



Nanc\ Willi\cr 




Daniel Woodard 



James Writilit 




-[24 FRESHMEN 



Maii\ lu Jiiiu II 

lo ycl lliciii amiiiRl campLis 




A portion of the NAMES Project 
AIDS Quilt was on display at the 
Greensboro Coliseum Nov. 30 
through Dec. 3. Several students 
including sophomore Tracey Corn 
volunteered to assist with the pre- 
sentation. 



Dr. Murray Arndt. an associate 
professor o\ English at UNCG 
spoke at an informal convocation 
for mid-year graduates of the in- 
stitution at 1 p.m. on Sunday. Dec. 
6 in Aycock Auditorium. 



This year many Triad residents 
were disappointed when the fcs- 
li\ e display of appro .ximately 2000 
hniiinaires wns cancelled. 



126 YEAR IN REVIEW 














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YEAR IN REVIEW 127 



i^mn/^:^' 




The men"s basketball team k>st its 
season opener in double mertiine 
to William & Mary on Tuesday. 
Dec. 1. 



The choral groups at UNCG in- 
creased some yuletide spirit dur- 
ing the annual Christmas concert 
at 3:15 p.m. Sunday. Dec. 6. in 
Aycock Auditorium. 



On Christmas Eve. the Greens- 
boro church choir performed 
Handel's Messiah. Directing the 
choir was UNCG's music profes- 
sor William Carroll. Channel 2 of 
CBS broadcasted the West Market 
Street United Methodist Church's 
production at 1 1:30 on Christmas 
F.\c ni'jht. 




128 YEAR IN REVIEW 




YEAR IN REVIEW 124 




On Saturday. Jan. 9, a UNCG 
student passed away. Javier Saca, 
19. was a tVeshrnan from San Sal- 
vador. El Salvador. He was a 
member ot' the Sigma Phi Epsilon 
fraternity. 



Dr. Paul M. Muchinsky. a nation- 
ally known industrial psychologist 
from Iowa State University was 
appointed as the first Joseph M. 
Bryan Distinguished Professor of 
Business at UNCG. 



UNCG kicked off its celebration 
of the 1993 Martin Luther King Jr. 
iK'liday with a week long program 
presented by the African History 
Celebration Planning Committee 
and the UNCG Office of Minority 
Student Affairs. 



130 YEAR IN REVIEW 





&US»€SS ANT ECDICWMCS 



k:':^,.jfM-:K^-',:i!k.^ ■^^iimi,. " 




YEAR IN REVIEW 131 




UNCG received a disbursement of 
S725.00() from tiie estate of Miss 
Ethel V, Butler, a UNCG alumna 
from Reidsville who died in Sep- 
tember of 1 990. 



Carol\n A. Moore, a facull\ 
member in the department of so- 
cial work, was the recipient of the 
seventh Martin Luther King Jr. 
Service Award. 



The week of Jan. 25-30. Campus 
Actisity Board sponsored a 196()'s 
theme week. C.A.B. Week was a 
v\ay lo promote CAB around 
campus. 



!32 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW \^^ 




Sludcnl Governnienl Presidenl 
Chuck Brewerblasted the proposed 
slLident tuition increase during his 
State of the Campus Address at 
Tuesday's Feb. 2 Student Legisla- 
tive Assembly (SLA) meetiuL;. 



Representatives from school sys- 
tems in North Carolina and other 
parts of the country came to re- 
crLut priispective teachers at Edu- 
cation career Day in Cone Ball- 
room. 



The Lady Spartans basketball team 
continued on its roll by defeating 
Coastal Carolina. The victory gave 
Head Coach Lynne Agee another 
win as she approtiches her 3l)()th 
career win. 



134 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW 135 




Joseph Dudley, a doctoral stu- 
dent at UNCG. won the Chris- 
topher Book Award tor his book 
Chotcau Creek: A Sioux Rciiii- 
niscciice. The book is about 
Dudley's experiences gri)wini: 
upon a Sioux Indian Reser\ation 
in South Dakota. 



The Board of TrListees' Coiii- 
niittee on Student Lite met Feb. 
1 1 to propose the addition ol 
Greek Housing as part ol' 
UNCG's Master Plan. The pro- 
posal uDLild provide grouji 
housing on the campus, at the 
corner of Aycock and Spring 
Garden Streets. 



The UNCG theatre department 
olfered an earnest look at social 
hypiterisy in their production ol 
The linporUmce of Bcin^ Ear- 
nest. 



136 YEAR m REVIEW 




'■ Wn i itHHiUmiiMi T *- i 1 1,1 





' 11 tti 




YEAH l.\' RFA lEW 137 




HdvMird Sanders, regionul director 
of the New Generation Campus 
Ministries, spoke to students at a 
lecture conceminu racism. 



UNCG's West African Ensemble 
performed with Djimo Kouyate in 
a feature presentation of traditional 
music of the West African Gnot. 
The concert was held in Cone 
Ballroom as part of UNCG's Black 
History Month celebration. 



Coach Mike Dement blasted stu- 
dents for apathetic attitudes. 



After heated debate regarding the 
LInited States" ban on homosexu- 
als ni the military, the UNCG 
chapter of the North Carolina 
Student Legislature (NCSL) and 
debate participants soted against 
NCSL's draft of a resolution sup- 
porting the ban on homose,\uals 
serxint: in the military. 



138 YEAR IN REVIEW 





•. ■ - *- -:> "■•' ■■■' 

YEAR l\ REVIEW \V) 



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The University is organized into a College of Arts and 
Sciences and six professional schools — those of Busi- 
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Performance; Human Environmental Sciences; Music; 
and Nursing. Undergraduates have a choice of over 100 
areas of study from which to select a major or concentra- 



Aciukmus 14 ^ 







tion within a major leading to one of six undergraduate 
degrees offered: Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Fine 
Arts (BFA), Bachelor of Music (BM), Bachelor of Science 
(BS), Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology (BSMT)I 
and Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). 



144 ,\, ,/,/,/«;. ■ 




v*>; 




The UNCG Board of Trustees, acting within the frame- 
work outlined for UNCG by The University of North 
Carolina Board of Governors, determines general direc- 
,;tions for UNCG's academic programs. Direct responsi- 
bility for administering academic programs rests within 
the various academic units. 



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The Chancellor has the responsibility for the administra 
tion of all campus programs, academic and non-aca- 
demic. 




-The Provost coordinates and oversees the graduate and 
undergraduate academic programs on the UNCG cam- 
pus. 



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The University faculty through the Faculty Senate, the 
Academic Cabinet, and the Undergraduate Curriculum 



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Committee, determines the general framework for 
UNCG undergraduate degree requirements and ap- 
proves the programs proposed by academic units. 



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More than 1,000 courses are available each semester. In 
addition, since UNCG is a member of the Greater 
Greensboro Consortium, students may cross-register ai 



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Bennett, Elon, Greensboro, Guilford, Guilford Technical 
Community Colleges, and High Point University, and 
I North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univer- 
sity without additional tuition. 



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The University also offers three doctoral degrees in 13 
areas of study, four Master of Fin Arts degrees, and sev- 
eral other master's degrees in a wide variety of concen- 
trations. 






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Most undergraduate degree programs require 122 se- 
mester hours with 24 - 36 semester hours of work in the 
major. 



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Many special academic programs are available as well. 
Among these Teacher Education has a long tradition. 
Five UNCG schools and several departments within the 



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Five UNCG schools and several departments within the 
College of Arts and Sciences offer programs leading to 
teacher certification in North Carolina and qualification 
for certification in most other states. Students may select 
certification programs in 32 subject areas. 



Acculcinirs 15? 



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The Honors Program provides an early opportunity for 
broad interdisciplinary study with team-taught sessions 
and independent projects. 




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Opportunities for interdepartmental studies are avail- 
able in International Studies, African American Studies, 
Women's Studies, Gerontology, and others. 







UNCG's seven preprofessional programs offer all of th( 
courses required for admission to medical or dental 
schools, to pharmacy, veterinary, or physical therapy 



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schools, or as needed for entrance into law school. A 
two-year pre-engineering curriculum prepares students 
:o transfer to schools with engineering programs. 



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Independent study, turorials, and internships are avail- 
able in most schools and departments. 



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Residential College provides a setting for innovative 
study and unity of academic and social experiences for 
freslimen and sophomores. 



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Students interested in study abroad for academic credit 
may select from several opportunities available, througt 



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summer study, semester abroad, or the junior year 
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The Mission 

Dedicated to teaching, research, and service for the ben- 
efit of the people of North Carolina, The University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro provides excellence in 
mutually supportive undergraduate and graduate edu- 



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cation. This mission is based upon its legacy of distin- 
guished undergraduate education for women and on 
the responsibilities inherent in its present role as a doc- 
toral-granting university. 



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Committed for more than a century to accomplished 
teaching and scholarship, the University fosters knowl- 
edge, intellectual skills, and the joy of reasoned inquiry 
in its students so that they may become thoughtful and 
responsible members of society It affords an exceptiona 
opportunity for all students, at any stage in their lives, 
to secure professional or other specialized preparation 




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firmly grounded in the liberal arts. In carrying out its re- 
sponsibilities for research and preparation firmly 
grounded in the liberal arts. In carrying out its responsi- 
bilities for research and creative endeavor, the Univer- 
sity offers undergraduate and graduate programs of dis- 
tinction and aims for national recognition for certain 
graduate programs, including all doctoral programs. 



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The University has a proud tradition of professional ancli 
public service. Recognizing that the society it serves is 
global, the University applies its intellectual resources t( 



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enhance the quality of Ufe in the Piedmont Triad region, 
the state of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. 



UaJcmics 169 




The University is dedicated to sustaining a community 
in which women and men of every race are motivated tc ^ 
develop their potential fully and to achieve an informed, 
appreciation of their own culture as well as the culture 
of others. As an institution in an urban setting, the Uni- 
versity offers students a rich array of experiential oppor 
tunities. Through its co-curricular programs, the Univer 



170 AccuU'iiiu 



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sity contributes to the social, aesthetic, and ethical de- 
velopment of its students and svipports them as they 
pursue their academic goals. Intellectual curiosity and 
tolerance, the natural resource of any learning environ- 
ment, are cultivated and prized by the University com- 
munity 








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Five or ten years from now, UNCG 
may be a very different place. The 
new Master Plan was revised to 
help the University change as its 
student hodv chances. 



According to Mr. Steven Baiiies 
ot (he Facilities Planning Commit- 
tee, the proposed changes wt)Lild 
help accommodate the University's 
New Division I athletics statLrs, 
continue the development ol a 
pedestrian campus, and support 
the changing natine of the student 
hodv. 



A new baseball diamond aiul sta- 
dium with a seating capacity of 
<S, ()()(), located on the corner of 
Aycock Street and Walker A veiuie 
across from the Student Recre- 
ation Center, is also included in the 
plan. 




184 YEAR IN REVIEW 




YKARLX REVIEW IS? 




Another feature of the Master Plan 
wtHild be to cut off vehicular traffic 
on Forest Street, Mchcr Street, 
most of College A\ enue and other 
streets in the interior of campus. 
Spring Garden Street will he con- 
\eited into a boule\ard by pro- 
hibiting parking and erecting a 
median. 



According to Mr. Barnes, univer- 
sities are one ol the few remaining 
pedestrian en\ironmenls in the 
L'nited States. "That model (of a 
|iedestrian environment) is the 
L'niversity model; it'ssynonymous 
with the University, and it fits in 
prett\ well with the history of our 
campus. It's a beautiful |ilace." 



186 YEAR IN REVIEW 













Yi:.\R IS REVIEW IS7 




The Master Plan calls tor con- 
struction of four additional park- 
nit: decks, which would alleviate 
parking problems created by clos- 
ing down streets to vehictilar traf- 
fic. 



According to Mr. Barnes. "We"re 
changing in terms of providing 
more non-traditional students, such 
as commuting students. That's the 
changing lace of olu' popidation." 



Other facilities in the wtirks arc a 
ncu nudti-million dollar nuisic 
building, additional classroom 
buildings and expansion on exist- 
ing bLiildinss, 



.As Mr. Barnes slated. "We w anl t( 
make UNCG a special place t( 
come to." 






188 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW \W 



Black autlioi" and actixist Julian 
Bund was the gLiest s|icakci" at the 
annual diniici" niectinii ol the 
Friends ol' the Librai"\ on 
Wednesday. March 24. Bond's 
addiess was titled "Ci\il Rights 
Then and Now." 



.'\ conleience on new develop- 
ments and directions in teacher 
education was held on March 19- 
20. Titled "Hxpanding the Con- 
versation: Promoting Universitv 
and School Faculty Collaboration 
in the Education ofTeachers." the 
event w as sponsored by the L'NCG 
school ofedLication. 



The 17th annual symposium in 
philosophy, focusing on the topic 
"Empirical Equivalence and the 
LI nderdetormi nation orThcories." 
was held March l'-)-21 in the 
Faculty Center. 



190 YEAR IN REVIEW 





^ 







YEAR IS REVIEW W\ 




A group of betv\een 100 to 130 
ARA workers who provide dining 
services at UNCG circulated fly- 
ers which claim they deserve more 
"respect" from their employers and 
tried to form a union to protect 
their rights as employees. "We're 
tr\ing to better ourselves by get- 
ting benefits." said John Johnson, 
u ho has worked at the Caf for ten 
>ears. 



Dr. Robert M. Solow. a Nobel 
Prize-winning economist lectured 
at UNCG on March 23 as part of 
the annual Kathleen P. Br\an lec- 
ture series. His speech w as titled. 
"The Clinton Economic Strateg\ : 
Hou Low Can L'nemployment 
Get'" "Most conserv alixe econo- 
mists will tell yoLi six percent. A 
reasonable economist v\ ill tell voli 
ll\ c and a half percent," said Solow . 
He stressed that too low an unem- 
plo\mcnl laic can accelerate in- 
llalion rates. 



192 YEAR IN REVIEW 



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YEAR I.\ Rt:\ /EW l'>3 




Dr. Eric Green, a geneticist at 
Wasiiington Uni\ersit\ in St. 
Louis, delivered a speech titled. 
"The Human Genome Project: 
Prospects and Implications fur 
Clinical Medicine." on March 29. 



Dr. JetTre\ Soles, an archeologist 
at UNCG. will continue e\ca\al- 
nig the Minoan settlement on the 
island of Mochlos. located olT the 
northern coast of Crete, this sum- 
nier through a ,$40,000 grant from 
ihc Institute or.Aes:eanPre-histor\. 



UNCG. which has hosted ap- 
proximately 100 post-season con- 
tests in its 30-\ear modern athletic 
history, has been selected to host 
the Big South Conterence men's 
soccer and women's basketball 
championship tournaments during 
the UnJ_i-y4 academic \ear. 



194 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR IN REVIEW 145 




The Exchange, a newly opened 
rcslaurant/coffee shop/bookstore 
on Tate Street, saw a maximum 
capacity crowd for the March JM 
presentation of the comedy group. 
Selected Hilarity. "Our motto is 
'our parents wish we were doing 
something else." but we are doing 
v\iial we want to do. If the real 
w Olid exists. wearegoingtoa\iiid 
it al all costs." 



Women from all o\er the Triad 
weie given the opportimity to learn 
moie about their gender in the 
workplace, society and history 
v\'hen the Friends of Women 
Studies sponsored an all-day con- 
ference entitled "Multicultural 
Women's Studies: Di\ersity onthe 
Common Ground" on March 1*^*. 



Dr. Carol Marsh, an associate 
professor of music, is co-editor of 
a new guide to 1 8th Century French 
dance: La Danse Noble: An liiveii- 
!iin ofDanccs and Sources. 



196 YEAR IN REVIEW 




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YEAR IN REVIEW U)7 




WaiTOii C'okci\ a voice iiia|or at 
UNCG. loxes the works o\ ihe 
ALislrian-bdin composer Ciusias 
Mahler, as well as ihose of 
Rachmaniiioffand Ralph Vaiiglian 
Williams. However, when he is 
not rehearsing for his role in the 
UNCG opera Giuuiii Sililnhi. 
Ce>ker likes to crank up the sounds 
of the Seattle-based grunge bands 
Alice in Chains and .Soundizarden. 



The lyy.^ Conlerencc on Alrican- 
American Culture Experience 
( C ACE ) focused on the topic, "The 
African-American Experience in 
Art." on March 25-27. CAGE is 
held annually at UNCG with the 
purpose of piomoting a better un- 
derstanding of the \arious aspects 
of the African-American experi- 
ence and cultLire. 



/'('/' Giil.\. a dramatic play hy Caryl 
Churchill, was presented in Curr\ 
Auditorium m conjunction with 
Women's History Month. The pla\ 
has strong messages on women's 
roles in the workplace, the home 
and throughout history. 



198 YEAR IN REVIEW 







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YEAR L\' REVIEW 149 




Cluick Brewer. 1442-93 Student 
Government President, eited the 
ineorporation of the new Greek 
Housing projeet into the UNCG 
Master Plan as one ot his major 
aehiexementsofoftice. The projeet 
is "totally new and innovative . . . 
I just hope it eontinues." Brewer 
feels his presidency was "suc- 
cessiui."' "I appreciate the trust 
that students at UNCG have in- 
vested in me to represent them on 
a stale-wide and nation-wide ba- 
sis, and I ha\e tried to justify that 
trust." 

Michael Pearson was elected 1 993- 
94 Student Government President. 
Pearson said that he will focus on 
making Student Government moie 
accessible and responsible to stu- 
dent needs. "I care about the needs 
of the students and I go otit and 
look for the concerns of the stti- 
dcnts." "I want to challenge the 
students to make known to their 
representatives the issues of con- 
cern to them." 

New this year was the use of 
electronic voting machines lent b\ 
the Guilford County Board ol 
Flections. 



200 YEAR IN REVIEW 





YEAR l.\ REVIEW 20\ 



Dr. Mary K. Sandford. an assistant 
professor of anthropology at 
UNCG edited a new book on the 
analysis of ancient human tissues 
for learning about the diet and 
physiology of past ci\ilizations. 



Di-. Ethel C. Glenn, professor of 
speech communication in the de- 
partment of communication and 
theatre at UNCG, won the Ralph 
G. Nichols Award for the co- 
authoied Outstanding Research 
Paper. 



The UNCG Spartans baseball team 
mamtained a u inning 1 3-8 record, 
but lost to ri\al Wake Forest L'ni- 
\ersitv 2—1. 



1 he UNCG Softball team posted a 
lecordof 16- 12-2 overall and split 
a pair ofgames with East Carol ilia. 
"This season was a very difficult 
start for us, in that the competition 
was very strong. "' said Head Coach 
Melody Cope. 



202 YEAR IN REVIEW 



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YEAR I.\ m:\ IKW 2i)} 




Nancy M. Bamett, an art student at 
UNCG studying with Arnold 
Doren, won a third place award tor 
her black and white photograph, 
"light."" in the 1993 Oriental New 
Segull National Student Photo 
Competition. 



For the first time in the histor\ ol 
the shopping area. Tale Street 
started a tradition of an annual 
mural painting contest. 



.Attempting to meet the educatumal 
needs otthe Hispanic culture, the 
new Hispanic Student Association 
was formed b\ Minorit\ Affairs. 



Li\iiii; ill the Rati World, an open 
forum series o'i panel discussions 
featuring alumni who share cither 
discussion topic interest, similar 
career fields, or similar L^NCG 
degrees w as held on campus. The 
program, sponsored by The UNCG 
■Alumni Association, was an ex- 
cellent opportunity for luir alumni 
and students to interact. 



204 YEAR IS REVIEW 






YEAR IN RE\ IHW !()'< 




Winning 12 of its last 14 games, 
mcluding nine consecutive wins, 
the UNCG women's basketball 
team completed a successful sea- 
son capped by a runner-up finish in 
the Big South Conference Tour- 
nament. 



More than 35 entiies by student 
.ind independent film and \ ideo 
ailists from around the state and 
nation were shown and judged at 
the third annual Carolina Film and 
Video Festi\al held from March 
-^1 -April 3 at UNCG. 



•An accelerated degree program at 
fiNCG was unveiled which will 
allow high achieving or acadcmi- 
call\ talented students to earn both 
an LUidcrgraduate degiee and a 
master's det;ree in fi\e vears. 



206 YEAR IN REVIEW 





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YEAR IN RFA'IEW 207 




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The first International Performing 
Arts Festival ForChildren was held 
in Greensboro on May 14 and 15. 
1 M93. With the funding and support 
of several foundations and theaters 
\n the Triad area. LINCG helped to 
present one of four festi\ als of this 
type in the United States. "The 
purpose of the festival is to foeus 
on performance arts for children 
featuring the best in the regional 
and international arts for kids in 
the area," said Tom Behm. co- 
chairperson. 



In a recent meeting of the Uni- 
versity Media Board (UMB). 
members voted to suspend Piiw 
Needles, the campus yearbook, 
for the next two years. "It was a 
hard decision to suspend Pine 
Needles" said Cathy Burress. 
editor of the yearbook. Accoid- 
ing to Buness. the main reason 
behind the suspension was lack 
of interest by the student body. 
Only approximately 150 to 200 
stLidents were buying an issue 
each year. 



224 YEAR IN REVIEW 






YEAR l.\ REVIEW 22^ 




CLOSING 111 



The University Song 

We raise our voices; let them swell 

In a chorus loud and strong; 

The rolling hills send back the sound 

Of our triumphant song. 

For in one great unbroken band 

With loyal hearts and true. 

Your sons and daughters stand and sing 

University, to you. 

Our college days run swiftly by 

And all too soon we part; 
But in the years that are to come 

deep graven on each heart 

Our motto "Service" will remain. 

And service we will do. 

And as we serve, our hearts will turn. 

University to you. 

Dear Alma Mater, strong and great. 

We never shall forget 

The gratitude we owe to you . . . 

A never-ending debt; 

All honor to your name we give 

And love we pledge anew 

Unfailing loyalty we bring. 

University, to you. 



Acknowledgements 

The 1993 Pine Needles Staff gratefully appreciates the 
considerable assistance from the following: 



The Carolinian 

Miriam Barkley, Director of UNCG 
Publications 

Bob Cavin and Wendy Hood, Photographers 
of UNCG Publications 

Kaleidoscope Video Yearbook 

Carl Wolf Studio, Inc. 

John L. Watson, Advisor, University 
Media Board 

Christina R. Ulosevich, Chairperson, 
University Media Board 




23(1 CLOSING 



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